Handing in Your Resignation – Is it all that bad?

Robert Sheffield November 26, 20193 mins read

So after much deliberation, you’ve decided to seek pastures new and progress to the next step in your career externally.

You’re at the stage where you’ve given verbal acceptance to your new prospective company & the green light for both (in most cases) references to be conducted. The much-anticipated document AKA your contract arrives in your inbox and after review, is crying out for you to sign on the dotted line.

What could possibly be the problem now?

You now need to take the dreaded steps of informing your Manager/Director of your decision to resign. Sounds familiar?

Handing in your resignation can be a particularly daunting experience for most of us due to various factors such as loyalty, appreciation for a plethora of opportunities over the years or even just simply; career security.

When you’ve made up your mind and decided to resign, it’s worth thinking about the reasons why you’ve decided to move externally in the first place, and if these are concrete, don’t look back! 

 

 

Reflect

Before you resign, think back to why you originally wanted to leave your current company & role. There’s a reason why you’ve decided to leave – so don’t forget it! Remind yourself of the reasons why you’re interested in this new position and keep this in mind when looking back. 

 

Failure to prepare is preparing to fail! 

This old saying couldn’t be truer.

Ensure you’re prepared and clear in your mind of the reasons why you’re moving on. Take the lead in the situation and lock in a meeting with your boss and keep it clear & succinct, thanking them for their guidance and informing them that you HAVE already accepted another opportunity elsewhere. If you pause or hesitate, you’re potentially allowing the pendulum to swing back into their favour. If you outline the reasons why, there really shouldn’t be any complications in this conversation. 

The language you use in this meeting is so important. Being assertive will go a long way and ultimately, your boss should respect your reasons.  

The awkward counter-offer

Great employees are hard to come by which is why there’s a strong likelihood you’ll be presented with a counter offer to keep you (as this will prevent problems in finding your replacement!). One of the likeliest scenarios could be that your boss offers you an extra $5K or $10K (there or thereabouts) to keep you or to even offer the previously discussed new title that you’ve consistently told them you deserve!

They may even conjure up the idea of an internal promotion/secondment to a new area of the business if they feel like this will change your mind.

As I mentioned, great employees are hard to come by so if you leave yourself open to a counter-offer scenario, expect to have even more headaches down the track if you decide to stay! 

Preparation is key and really can make the difference here. If you’ve invested time and effort in going through a process to secure a new role, history suggests you should see out this final stage confidently, safe in the knowledge that you’re making the right decision. 

Robert Sheffield's picture
Managing Director - Greater China
rsheffield@morganmckinley.com.hk

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